Three Rivers Greenway

Three Rivers Greenway is more than what lies in Richland County, which is already quite a bit. There’s also a good chunk in Lexington County in West Columbia and Cayce. But this post will be on the Richland County side.

The three rivers in the title refer to the Broad, Saluda, and Congaree Rivers. The latter is created by the Broad and Saluda. The northernmost point of the greenway can be accessed north of Broad River Road. At the parking lot you can see the lock that starts the Columbia canal. Walk across that and you can see the diversion dam. It’s a nice walk through the woods on the island especially on a hot day. From here you can walk all the way to Riverfront Park in downtown Columbia. Unfortunately due to the 2015 flood, part of the canal on which the walkway ran is gone so it’s not possible to get to the Gervais Street Bridge and the State Museum.

Further South, though, is Granby Park. It’s located at the end of Catawba. Here the trail continues, swooping into the Olympia and Granby Mill area and through Olympia Park before puttering out. While part isn’t along the river, it is still a nice walk through a historic mill village and mills. In Olympia Park I was lucky enough to catch sight of a blue heron.

The walkways on the river are lighted and paved with boardwalks and overlooks. You can walk, run, or ride your bicycle. It is also wheelchair accessible. It is currently twelve and a half miles long and growing. At this time they are working on a segment on the Richland County side of the Saluda River, along the zoo.

 

Link:

http://riveralliance.org/project/three-rivers-greenway/

Advertisements

Soda Cap Connector

Columbia’s The Comet Soda City Connector route started in late August. For now and until January February it will be free! According to the newscast, the free price may be extended if there’s enough interest. Otherwise it’ll be $1.50 (with no transfers). There are two routes. One goes from the The Vista to Five Points, and the other goes from the Vista to Taylor Street (Benedict College/Allen University area) It runs Tuesday through Saturday, 10 am to 6 pm. It begins/ends at the SC Museum, I think at the back near Washington Street. Both routes stop at Lincoln Street, on Main Street, the State House. Then one goes on to Taylor and Harden and the other to Five Points. Points of interest along the way are: Edventure children’s museum, Vista restaurants and shops, memorial park, Columbia museum of art, Maxcy Gregg park, Main street district, USC, Five points restaurant and parks, colleges.

Historic Columbia Foundation Brochures

I’ve mentioned these brochures before and today I’m going to go a little more in-depth. These are nice, quality, attractive, little booklets put out by the Historic Columbia Foundation. They are 4″ x 9″ closed (8″ x 9″ open) with a fold out map in the back. The number of pages vary. There are also one page pamphlets. Besides giving background information on various historical sites in Columbia, they make excellent souvenirs.

I nabbed most of mine at the visitor center on Lincoln Street. It’s located at the convention center. You can also pick them up at the Robert Mills House gift shop on Blanding Street. One can’t download them from the website (historiccolumbia.org), which is a pity, but the website does have different tours to view.

The brochure contain driving and walking tours, most of which are in the downtown area. Some expand further out such as the African-American Heritage Sites Tour. You’ll need a car for that one. Most of the others are guides for walking.

Each brochure begins with a short introduction. Next are pages with of the stops on the tour complete with a picture or drawing of site mentioned and a description. On the last page is the fold out map. It makes learning about Columbia fun.

If you don’t want to do the tour thing on your own, the foundation offers tours for a fee. Visit the website to find out more.

Focus on Columbia

richland-columbia-2016-09-capital-from-main-st

I’m going to be limited where I travel this year so I’ve decided to concentrate on sights in and around Columbia, our state’s capital. Every month I’ll go visit a new place for me, or maybe an old one. In January, I went to Riverbanks Zoo, but I’ll do a post on that later. Right now I’ll put links for places I’ve already written a post. There’s plenty to see and visit so keep tuned.

City of Columbia

https://47parkssc.wordpress.com/2015/11/15/columbia/

Congaree National Park

https://47parkssc.wordpress.com/2015/05/28/congaree-national-park/

Harbison State Forest

https://47parkssc.wordpress.com/2016/11/25/harbison-state-forest/

River Front Park

https://47parkssc.wordpress.com/2016/08/15/river-front-park-historic-columbia-canal/

Sesquicentennial Park

https://47parkssc.wordpress.com/2015/02/15/sesquicentennial-state-park/

Harbison State Forest

I’d heard plenty about Harbison State Forest, but never visited until a national hike day, or maybe it was visit a park day. Whatever day it was, I went. Harbison Forest is located in Columbia along the Broad River. It’s not difficult to find being just east of Broad River Road. I pulled in the parking lot, nice and shady, paid my five dollars and studied the trail options.

richland-harbison-sf-05-firebreak-trail-creek

In this 2,177 acre park there are plenty of trails to choose, twenty miles worth! Choose from the easy Discovery trail, 0.5 miles, to the six mile, difficult Lost Creek trail. The 4.4 mile, moderate Firebreak trail which interconnects to other trails. Or you can customize your trip if you wish, like I did. I can’t even tell you which ones I used. 

richland-harbison-sf-07-firebreak-trail-flower

The trails are for use for hikers and off road bicycling except for two which are for hiking only. Listen out for the call from a rider to announce themselves. There’s a canoe ramp that provides access for kayaks and canoes.

Harbison State Forest is one of the largest urban green spaces located within a city limits in the eastern part of the U.S. It’s named after Samuel P. Harbison who is/was from Pennsylvania. He provided much of the funds needed for the land to be purchased. Thank you, Mr. Harbison.

How to get there:

Take I-20 to exit #65 and go northwest on US #176 (Broad River Road) 5.9 kilometers (3.7 miles). The forest will be on the right side of the road.

Links:

https://www.state.sc.us/forest/refharb.htm

What’s Close by:

River Front Park and Historic Columbia Canal

Riverbanks Zoo

Lake Murray