Greenwood State Park

The drive I took from Columbia to Lake Greenwood wove through the counties of Saluda and Greenwood, past peach trees and several interesting buildings. It was a great start of the day to visit Lake Greenwood State Park. The park sits partially on a peninsula on the Greenwood County side of Lake Greenwood. Besides the lake, there’s a campground, nature trail, and picnic area and more.

Even without walking the nature trail, I trekked far in this park. From the parking lot, to the John Drummond and Holly Self Drummon Environmental Education Conference Center (what a mouthful). This building houses the Civilian Conservation Corp Museum, the park being one of sixteen built by the CCC in SC. and down to lake, along it, and back again, meandering all the while.

Make sure to stop near the entrance and read the plaques about the unfinished wall. The men working here with the CCC were building the wall, when war was declared against the Germans and Japanese. They all enlisted to fight. The unfinished wall is a good tribute to those who created this park and their sacrifice in World War II

Below the Drummon Center is a good place to go fishing. I saw several people engaged in that activity as I walked around. I’m afraid I don’t have the patience. I live to move around. It’s also a nice place to gaze at the 114,000 acre lake.

There’s swimming here too, but it’s at your own risk as there’s no lifeguard. Watch the little ones and even the bigger ones if they don’t know how to swim. Or you can go boating since there’s a ramp to put your boat in the water.

The park, which is 914 acres, was built on land donated by Greenwood County in 1938. It’s well worth the visit. I think there’s an ironman competition held here every year. Check the website to find out the date.

How to Get There

Exit 74 from I-26 and head west on SC34. Turn right on SC702. The park is off that road.

Links:

https://southcarolinaparks.com/lake-greenwood

What’s Close By:

Lake Greenwood

Ninety Six NHS

Ninety Six (the town)

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Robert Mills District

 

The official Robert Mills tour consists of two parts, but I’ll mash them into one. The district gets its name from the two buildings designed by Mills, The Robert Mills House and SC Asylum. By starting at the Robert Mills House, you should be able to get the brochures at the shop there. When I did the walk, I divided it into two, but took a few side trips such as to the Woodrow Wilson House.

One can take a tour inside the Robert Mills building, go to the website for the hours. Interiors do little for me, except for castles. Bring your comfy shoes. Walking on pavement is harder than hiking on dirt. You can eat at places around here, on Main Street, or you can do what I do, and bring your own sandwich and water bottle.

 

1615 Blanding – Hampton Preston Mansion

Built 1818. During it’s existence it has housed a governor as well as college women. It used to be nationally known for its gardens and they are currently on working on the grounds.

1401 Laurel – Debruhl-Marshall House

Built 1820. The architect is unknown and some say it might be Robert Mills as it’s similar to the Robert Mills House.

1410 Laurel –

Built 1900. It was a single family dwelling until the 1960’s when it was subdivided. It has since been remodeled for commercial use.

1422 Laurel – Shannon Smith Stuckey House

Built in the late 1880’s, this house is house for its distinctive architecture.

1511 Laurel – Sims-Stackhouse Mansion

Built sometime before 1853. It once sat on a raised basement, but in 1909, then owner T.B. Stackhouse removed the top floors and relocated them to this location.

2025 Marion – Modjeska Monteith Simkins House

Built in the 1890s, Civil Rights icon Modjeska Monteith Simkins lived here around 1932 to 1992.

1403 Richland – Mann-Simons Cottage

This is one of the few houses in Columbia owned by an African American in Antebellum times.

1601 Richland – Seibels House

This may be Columbia’s oldest standing house. Part of it is supposed to date back to 1796. It’s current look is from the 1920’s and is one many renovations it’s had.

How to Get There:

The Robert Mills District is in downtown Columbia. The district is on the east and west side of US76/Bull Street. A good starting point is the Robert Mills House. From Bull Street, go east one block on Blanding Street.

Links:

https://www.historiccolumbia.org/tour-locations?neighborhood=Robert%20Mills%20District%20West

What’s Close By:

Historic Main Street

SC State House and Complex

USC

Allen University

Benedict College